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FAGERHULT E-LIGHT

This month we take a look at the latest public light installations inspired by Christmas. The first one is Skidmore, Owings & Merrill’s design for a latticed pavilion in lieu of a Christmas tree for the courtyard of a building designed by the late Jørn Utzon in Aalborg, Denmark. Japanese artist Toshihiko Shibuya created ‘Snow Pallet 9’, a colourful land art piece that changes depending on the amount of snow and sunlight cast. Finally, British artist Alex Chinneck has created a seven-metre-tall installation of a frozen Christmas tree inside a huge ice cube in London's King’s Cross.

SOM creates Christmas tree alternative at Denmark's Utzon Center

Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) designed this latticed pavilion in lieu of a Christmas tree for the courtyard of a building designed by the late Jørn Utzon in Aalborg, Denmark.

 The Alternative Christmas Tree Sculpture is installed at the Utzon Center, the final building to be designed by Sydney Opera House architect Jørn Utzon before his death in 2008.

 Openings in the base allow visitors to step into the centre of the tower, which stretches to seven metres in height and pokes above the roofline of the surrounding blocks.

SOM used Peter Lassen's modular GRID system – a Danish design icon – to create the latticed form. It is illuminated with brightly coloured lights.

For more information, read the article here.  

Toshihiko Shibuya showcases snow’s vivid reflective qualities

With his ninth edition of ‘Snow Pallet’ — a series of environmental, winter works — Japanese artist Toshihiko Shibuya continues his exploration of snow, its vivid reflective surface and how an installation work can change the landscape. 

Showcased in Rokkatei-Sapporo main store’s front yard, ‘Snow Pallet 9’ is a colourful land art piece that changes depending on the amount of snow and sunlight cast on its components, offering a perpetual conversation between nature and its interventions.

 ‘Snow Pallet 9’ is composed of iron objects of different shapes that occupy the snowy scenery. Their underside has been painted with fluorescent, vibrant hues that are later cast onto the surface of the snow generating polychromatic stains. 

The work, which will remain there until March 2017, will be transformed by nature, time and light, showcasing a candy-like result. 

For more information, read the article here

Alex Chinneck traps Christmas tree inside gigantic ice cube

British artist Alex Chinneck has created a Christmas tree inside a huge ice cube in London's King’s Cross.

The seven-metre-tall installation is situated between the colourful fountains outside Central Saint Martins' Granary Square campus.

To create the piece, Chinneck trapped a five-metre-tall Christmas tree inside a two-tonne block of resin carved to look like an ice cube.

A surrounding puddle, which looks as if it is melting into the ground-level fountain, is actually made from 250 kilograms of clear wax.

At night, 1,200 lights adorning the tree glow brightly through the resin.

For more information, read the article here.  

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